Idioms

1. A PIECE OF CAKE: Something that is very easy to do.

  • Learning English is a piece of cake for me.
  • She thought that this exam is going to be a piece of cake.
  • Teaching is a piece of cake for you if you are a skilled teacher.
  • If you have the right people with you then life becomes a piece of cake for you.

There is no need to worry about you computer. I’ll fix it. It’s a piece of cake for me.

2. HIT THE NAIL ON THE HEAD: To do exactly the right thing; to do something in the most effective and efficient way.

  • You hit the nail on the head when you speak about corruption.
  • The teacher hit the nail on the head when he said that you don’t need to worry about making mistakes when you speak English.
  • We thought that we hit the nail on the head when we told him that he spoke too much.
  • Well done Aakash, you have hit the nail on the head.

3. YOU CAN’T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER: It means that you can’t judge the quality or character of someone or something just by the outer appearance.

  • He looks dumb but he is very intelligent. You can’t judge a book by its cover.
  • Even though the situation looks bad on the surface but u can’t judge a book by it’s cover.
  • Even though he lives a simple life, he is actually the richest man in town, you can’t judge a book by its cover.
  • That professor may seems slow and awkward, but you can’t judge a book by it’s cover. He is one of the brightest minds in his field.
  • You should not trust a stranger by the clothes he wears. You can’t judge a book by it cover.

4. BITE OFF MORE THAN YOU CAN CHEW: To try to do more than you can do.
By starting another company he bit off more than he can chew.

  • I thought I could finish this report by Monday.
  • I bit off more than I could chew.
  • I started working on the hard problems first and quickly realised I was biting off more than I could chew.
  • You should carefully estimate the cost of the project first. Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
  • If you want to succeed in life you should not bite off more than you can chew.

5. LET THE CAT OUT OF THE BAG: To reveal a secret or surprise by accident.

  • Mr. Snowden let the cat out of the bag when he made the secret military documents public.
  • She let the cat out of the bag occidentally when she mentioned him in front of the guests.
  • It’s a secret. Try not to let the cat out of the bag.
  • When he glanced at the door, he let the cat out of the bag. We knew then that he was expecting someone to arrive.

Tom let the cat out of the bag when he mentioned the name of the movie.
           
6. SCRATCH SOMEONE’S BACK: To do someone a favour in return of a favour.

  • We both are in trouble and we should help each other. So, you scratch my back and i’ll scratch yours.
  • We suspect that he has been scratching his boss’s back.
  • When the time comes I will be ready to scratch your back.
  • There is no need for you to scratch my back.
  • You do my homework and i’ll do your chores. You scratch my back and i’ll scratch yours.

7. ACCIDENTALLY ON PURPOSE: If you do something intentionally but pretend it was an accident. You do it accidentally on purpose.

  • I accidentally on purpose deleted his phone number, so I couldn’t contact him again.
  • I didn’t like his glasses so I dropped them accidentally on purpose.
  • She accidentally on purpose forgot to bring his address with her, so that we are not able to visit him.
  • She missed the meeting accidentally on purpose.
  • I missed the school bus accidentally on purpose to escape the exam.

8. ADD FUEL TO THE FLAMES: If you add fuel to the flames, you do or say something that makes a difficult situation even worse.

  • He forgot her wedding invitation and his apologies only added fuel to the flames.
  • Shouting at a crying child just adds fuel to the flames.
  • His being polite only added fuel to the flames. Geeta was furious.
  • Public is already angry with inflation, another increase in the oil prices will be adding fuel to the flames.
  • If Raj is angry don’t say anything, you will be just adding fuel to the flames.

9. I AM ALL EARS: To say that you are all ears means that you are listening very attentively.
Of course, I want to know. I am all ears.

  • I am all ears, waiting to hear your latest excuse for not doing your homework.
  • I am all ears, tell me why you could not finish the job on time.
  • I am all ears, tell me what they had to say.
  • I’ve said what I had to say. Now, I am all ears.

10. ANSWER CALL OF NATURE OR NATURE’S CALL: When a person answers the call of nature or nature’s call means that they go to the toilet.

  • I had to get up in the middle of the night to answer nature’s call.
  • She had to go into the woods to answer the call of nature.
  • Could we stop somewhere. I need to answer the call of nature.
  • Does anyone need to answer the call of nature before we set off.
  • He dropped his trousers, sat down and began answering the call of nature.